Generation Z 2017 Summer Spotlight!

Posted by Mary McIlrath on Thu, Aug 03, 2017 @ 01:07 PM

It’s August already, and Back-to-School is just around the corner.  Plenty of families have already started the rush of shopping for school supplies and the all-important First Day of School new outfit.  Youth still do have a few precious weeks of summer left, though.  Check out our infographicfor the YouthBeat Summer Spotlight 2017!

gen z summer spotlight image.png

Click here to download YouthBeat's Generation Z 2017 Summer Spotlight!

 

Tags: youth research, kids, kids tweens teens market research, Youth, Back to School, kids tweens teens, Gen Z

Generation Z Infographic: Summer Fun and Back to School Shopping

Posted by Mary McIlrath on Mon, Jul 25, 2016 @ 01:53 PM

It’s summertime, and from preschoolers to teenagers, the youth of America are soaking up the sun and enjoying their vacations. Our YouthBeat team has put together an infographic to show you stats on:

  • Places they’ve visited,
  • What they’re doing,
  • And what’s on their playlists.

But pretty soon, as my father Bob McIlrath says, “it will be time to close down the swimming pool and open up the school house.” With that comes Back-to-School shopping! We’ve also included important numbers on what exactly back-to-school shopping looks like including who’s shopping, and at what stores they want to shop.

Click here to download our infographic!

 

Tags: Back to School, shopping, Gen Z, summer

Kid and Teen Trends: Back-to-School Edition

Posted by Mary McIlrath on Tue, Sep 01, 2015 @ 11:40 PM

Welcome Back, Bulldogs, Tigers, and Warriors (Oh My)!

Across the country, some schools are already in session, while others still have a week left to prepare.  Social media is brimming with “1st day of school” photos, and high school seniors’ throwback photos to the first day of Kindergarten.

Meanwhile, here at YouthBeat, we’ve been investigating lifestyle and attitude trends over time.  Click here to download our hot-off-the-presses Back-to-School infographics for 2015-2016.  We’ve looked at seniors, entering their final year of high school, and 1st graders, just beginning their journey through primary education.YouthBeat Back to School

The short story?  The kids are all right!  There have been some downright heavy events in the culture and news over the last few years that hit close to home for youth of all ages (a tumultuous economy, public violence, bullying, and concerns over sports safety, to name a few).  These types of events can lead to angst, isolation, and depression.  But what we’re seeing instead are youth who are clinging more tightly to their families.  They’re into healthy habits.  They are bullish on the future.

For more information on YouthBeat and the data available through our subscriptions, please contact Mary McIlrath at marym@crresearch.com.

Tags: kids, Teens, Back to School, trends

5 New School Lunch Truths

Posted by Amy Henry on Fri, Sep 12, 2014 @ 01:58 PM

Kids across the country are officially back to school, and we thought we would kick off the119417656 school year with a few new “truths” related to one of the most important parts of kids’ and parents’ days: school lunch. Whether you’re concerned about the cafeteria consumer or the meal maker, there are a few new (or at least novel) truths that might change the way you think about fitting into this occasion:

  1. Time is of the essence. According to a study conducted by the Partnership to Promote Healthy Eating in Schools, 20 minutes should be allowed for lunch after children have sat down at their tables. In middle school, this means providing an adequate timeframe for kids to move from their class to the cafeteria, via their locker if necessary. It means having the right number of lines/cash registers to minimize the waiting time. And it means taking into account the load they’re carrying (can a tray fit on top of the pile of books they’re carrying, or do they need to factor in finding a spot at a table before they return to the lunch line). Of course, if you’re in food service, the implications are considerable. But even if you’re humbly hoping that your containers or snack foods make it to their bags or boxes, you have to keep in mind that convenience matters.
  2. Sharing isn’t the same as it used to be. Trading snacks, leering at the lunches of others – these are rituals that have almost completely disappeared. And where snack sharing is permitted, it’s certainly more limited than it used to be, given sensitivity to food allergies and eating restrictions imposed by parents. For today’s kids who are raised in a less critical and less judgmental culture regarding others (every family is different, every mom and dad have different rules about eating, etc.), they’re less likely to brag about their own lunch or look to others for food ideas. You know who does ask about school lunches? Moms and dads! Kids might be less inclined to share intel on their friend’s brown bag brings, but parents do ask.
  3. Speaking of parents…Parents might be privy to more information and opinions than ever when it comes to their kids’ food – especially in a setting like school. So, while it bucks the conventional wisdom, perhaps it’s not surprising that kids report that parents are more likely to introduce them to new school lunch foods than their friends (60% versus 37% for kids ages 6 to 10). Parents are all about healthy options and alternatives to old stand-bys, but they also want to pack lunches that are inspired and creative. Kids report that their favorite lunch foods are sandwiches, and their favorite beverage is water, but moms and dads sometimes want to send their little students to school with more exciting fare.
  4. Sustainable containers. As much as kids and parents might prefer coming home without extra dishes, today’s parents and kids often opt for containers that are more sustainable and reusable. It makes parents feel thrifty and kids feel like they’re heeding the many mentions of “earth-friendliness” that pervade their days.
  5. Brain food is better. Today’s kids often have a very different definition of lunchbox “treat” than kids from the past. This cohort can’t always have cupcakes at school on their birthdays, or bring candy in their lunch bags. They’re less exposed to sugary and salty vending machine snacks, and even juice boxes are often considered a once-in-a-while drink versus the refillable water bottle that kids often bring right into their classroom. Kids get constant communication about feeding their bodies – and their brains – with the right kind of food. Don’t put them in a bind – health isn’t a benefit that kids seek out, but it is one that they might respond to in surprisingly open ways.

When it comes to understanding school lunch, make sure your brand isn’t relying on outdated ideas or conventional wisdom that no longer tracks. Brands that stay current with today’s cafeteria are sure to get an “A” among parents, kids and even teachers.

Tags: kids, parents, family, Teens, Back to School, tweens, school, school lunch

Is Out-of-School Shopping the New Back-to-School Shopping?

Posted by Amy Henry on Mon, Aug 18, 2014 @ 03:24 PM

128935230Increasingly, the back-to-school list includes as many “must-nots” as “must-haves.” These restrictions range from a ban on candy to limits on chips and a veto on peanuts, tree nuts and shellfish (scrap that shrimp sandwich, mom!). Even at schools that don’t require uniforms, dress codes have become increasingly strict. Depending on age of child, schools have prohibited everything from colors that could be interpreted as gang-related to t-shirts with words of any sort on them. Some schools are urging parents to forego the juice box for a refillable water bottle. At some private schools—and even some public ones—parents can expect to see that all or some characters can’t appear on backpacks or t-shirts. And, of course, technology that might be deemed permissible at home is often forbidden on school grounds.  

This might suggest that the back-to-school shopping trip is more rule-driven than ever. It certainly suggests that it’s a little less fun trip for many kids.

But will parents also miss a bit of the magic of selecting the perfect backpack or the peer-approved outfit? Based on what we know at YouthBeat about today’s moms and dads, and on what our C+R Shopper Insights expert, Terrie Wendricks, has seen in stores and online, they might.

Unlike parents of the past, today’s parents are perfectly fine with kid “asks.” They value their kids’, tweens’ and teens’ opinions like no cohort that came before, and see their children’s requests as keys to understanding their culture, in general, and their personal passions specifically. Having grown up with popular culture more prevalent in their lives, Millennial Moms and Dads, in particular, are more likely to share their kids’ interests in properties and characters. And with an increasing convergence around the content they consume, parents are more likely to side with their kids’, tweens’ and teens’ desire to express themselves through their affinities.

Nowhere is this dynamic more evident than in the retail environment where parents and kids seem to find more to agree over than to argue about! Terrie told us, “Today’s parents seek to ensure their children have their own ‘moments,’ especially in social situations like school, but today’s kids also recognize the reasons for parental restrictions across a wide variety of categories.”

So what happens when schools shun the very items that parents are happy to provide? Parents find other reasons to buy. So this back-to-school season, and for more to come, we predict that the out-of-school shopping list will be as important as the in-school one. Of course, with many families continuing to stick to the kinds of tightened budgets that they adopted during the down economy of the past few years (despite some evidence that families are returning to their traditional retail options over “band-aids” like dollar stores), the necessities are a priority. But if your product or brand is no longer on that list, we think there’s still hope for you…

  1. Position your product or offering as essential to “after school.”
  2. Forego messages about success and readiness, the domain of those in-school products, and instead speak to parents’ belief in the importance of play.
  3. Leverage parents’ nostalgia for characters that they grew up with, and that might provide their offspring with the kind of out-of-school enjoyment that parents can recall—Ninja Turtles, anyone?
  4. Remind parents that the fall “reset” doesn’t just involve the re-establishment of serious routines—it can also be a time to plan for fun!
  5. Remember that out-of-school offerings have permission to be packaged differently—think family size and shareable versus lunchbox friendly. 

Tags: kids, mom, Teens, Back to School, dad, tweens, millennials